Skants.

Hello! I have been away a while, sorry. I noticed this skirt almost as soon as it was released by the VPLL site. I was enchanted by the pointed scallops on the front flap. I received this pattern from them at the end of April!! Quite a while ago! And although I was quite eager to start it after deciding which fabrics to use (I decided to use only fabrics I already have in my stash for the 1912 projects, to use it up), which as usual took some time… first I had a studio move which took two weeks of my energy and once the dust had settled, literally, my day job caught up with me and kept me busy for several weeks.

I am glad those weeks intervened. They allowed me to think seriously about this skirt. The fabrics I chose are fall colours as well as fall weight. I have had a lovely plum corduroy for a few years, just waiting for the right time. Two years ago I acquired a smallish piece of velvet from a friend which really looks marvellous with the plum cord. The velvet is extremely soft and has a wonderful print on it in shades of tan, burnt orange, 2 shades of golden-yellow, 2 shades of lilac, 2 shades of violet, rust, brown, olive and the background plum. It depicts scenes of riders on horses and a lot of lush vegetation. The print is reminiscent of 16th Cent. Turkish or Indian designs. It has a splendid *hand* and looks beautiful.

As I was finishing swagged drapes for the Museum, I was preparing mentally for my much-anticipated #200 skirt. I came to the realization that if I actually made a skirt with these fabrics, for use in fall and winter, I would hardly ever wear it. Fall is miserably damp and increasingly cold until winter hits us with its miserable cold and often damp. I hardly ever wear skirted clothing in winter. It doesn’t keep me warm enough. What to do, what to do?

This skirt reminded me of a sarong, or a wrap-around skirt and I really liked the pointed scallops of its front panel. And I had been thinking so much about my lovely plum cord… really looking forward to finally wearing it.

Make pants! Use the front scalloped piece as it is meant to be, but put it over pants rather than a straight skirt. YES! And so my *skants* idea was born. My husband coined that word, using the *skorts* (combo shorts and skirt) as an example.

Another volley of bridal sewing prevented me from getting to it last week. I took my weekend to start the #200. I cut it out, using my very simple pant pattern for the cord. In order to make the front scalloped piece the right size, I overlapped the pant pattern on the #200 pattern and cut the front flap so the scallops would be half way across my right leg. It entirely hides the front left leg.

I cut a facing from the same velvet as the flap and sewed it to the scalloped front piece. When sewing points like this, it is better to use a shorter than usual stitch, so the seam doesn’t allow as much fraying after you have cut away the point and cut into the valley. I also strengthen the points and valleys by using a drop of Fray-Check on them. Making these cuts assures a sharper point in both directions. See photos.

 

I cut the waistband facings from the cord. Because I am putting in a side zipper, the front waist facing is all one piece, the back facing is also just one piece. They got sewn together on the left side, leaving the right side open for the zipper.

I assembled the pants by sewing the middle seam of front and then back. I sewed a (covered) zipper into the right side seam and I then finished that leg by sewing the inside seam of both legs.

In order to have the scalloped flap sit properly, I inserted it between the front and back pant pieces and sewed the side seam up!

The next thing to do was attach the facing after trying on the pants for fit. I decided to sew the printed flap all along the waist into the facing. Then I had to choose buttons. How many I would use would simply depend on how many matching ones I could find in my boxes. I found four plum coloured buttons with stripes on them. They look like they are corduroy too. Perfect for this! 🙂 There were only four but because these are pants after all, I thought to let the flap do exactly that! It is loose from the fourth scallop down. That way it is easier to walk.

Then I hemmed the pants and the flap. I tacked down the flap’s facing and also sewed the top four points down to the pants because they had a tendency to curl outwards. Can’t have that!

I am a professional seamstress and designer. The instructions for assembling the skirt were easy and straightforward to me. I simply didn’t use them as I ended up making pants. If I had made the skirt, I would have had to alter the pattern to a larger size than what it came in. I did however recommend this pattern to a friend who also likes the vintage clothing look. She is an avid hobbyist and understood the instructions easily.

I would think that an intermediate level seamstress would be better suited to this pattern, as the scallops do require attention to detail and careful cutting and assembling which then need special cutting for a nice sharp edge.

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